WP: Saudi Arabia is a dungeon, Alkhalifa heavily criticised at HRC

The UK’s relations with Saudi Arabia were criticised by senior figures of the Labour Party at the ongoing annual conference in Brighton. Shadow Foreign Secretary Emily Thornberry criticized the ruling Conservative government for turning a blind eye to Saudi Arabia’s deadly war against Yemen, and selling Riyadh new weapons that would be used against Yemeni civilians. “It is rank hypocrisy,” she said. “But it also illustrates a basic fact that the world we want to see – a world governed by ethics and values, a world based on rules and laws will never truly exist as long as governments and world leaders get to decide for themselves when it suits them to play by the rules and when the rules can be safely ignored.”. Last week it was announced that Saudi Arabia was not welcome to attend the conference because of its destructive war on Yemen. Pro-democracy, human rights and anti-war activists have welcomed these steps which come at a time when the Saudis are wreaking havoc not only in the region but the world over for their role in the mushrooming of extremism and terrorism. The Saudi war on Yemen has surfaced repeatedly at the Human Rights Council session in Geneva where an independent inquiry into Saudi crimes is demanded.
In an attempt to dampen the criticism of their tribal regime, the Saudis announced that they would allow women to drive cars after 28 years of struggle by women activists. The move is seen as a cunning move to stifle the international criticism of the kingdom’s dismal human rights record. Yesterday a prominent writer was arrested for his mild criticism of the regime. Jamil Al Farisi joins hundreds of prisoners of conscience languishing behind bars in the kingdom of fear.  On 20th September The Washington Post’s editorial was titled: “The   ‘new’ Saudi Arabia is still a dungeon”. It said: ONCE AGAIN, news from Saudi Arabia points toward the old thinking and not the modern society promised by the new crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman. Despite the lofty rhetoric of the crown prince’s “Vision 2030” declaration, he increasingly resembles an earlier generation of leaders with authoritarian methods. Saudi Arabia has been, and seems determined to remain, a dungeon for those who want to practice free speech.”
On 20 September 2017, UN Assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights Andrew Gilmour presented the office’s eighth report on reprisals at the 36th Session of the Human Rights Council (HRC). He said that the Bahraini regime has engaged in an “ongoing trend of major harassment and intimidation against human rights defenders; the imposition of travel bans on selected individuals; the arrest, detention, and ill-treatment of targeted individuals; and one particular case involving sexual assault and torture as a form of reprisal,” referring to human rights defender Ebtisam al-Saegh, In Bahrain, reprisals function as part of an “orchestrated crackdown on civil society,” and “the authorities have resorted to drastic measures to curb dissenting opinions.” The report expressed particular concern about the government’s consistent use of mass travel bans as a “politically motivated strategy to prevent human rights defenders” from travelling to international events such as HRC sessions. It names activists Hussain Salam Ahmed Radhi, Ebtisam al-Saegh, Ebrahim Al-Demistani, Abdulnabi Al-Ekry, Mohammed Jawad, Nedal Al-Salman, Enas Oun, and human rights lawyer Mohammed Al-Tajer as examples. Echoing the spokesperson for the High Commissioner for Human Rights, the report expresses grave concern that the Bahraini government’s repeated targeting of Nabeel Rajab is “connected to his engagement with the Human Rights Council.”
On 22nd September Amnesty International (AI) issued an Urgent Action calling for the release of Nabeel Rajab. It said that he is being tried in relation to comments posted and retweeted on his Twitter account about the war in Yemen and allegations of torture in Jaw prison is. If found guilty, Nabeel Rajab faces up to 15 years’ imprisonment. AI urged people to call for his immediate and unconditional release, ensure he is not tortured, urge Alkhalifa to uphold the right to freedom of expression and repeal laws that criminalize the peaceful exercise of those rights. Over the past two weeks the native Baharna majority have been harassed as they prepared to commemorate the martyrdom of Imam Hussain ibn Ali. ISIS-style masked members of regime’s Death Squads roamed towns and villages tearing banners and firing on people. A total of 43 attacks were recorded by AlWefaq prior to the start of the public mourning.
As the attacks on the political inmates at the notorious Jaw prison continued, reports are circulating of serious illnesses among inmates. Among the names are Qassem Ali Aradi from Samaheej and photojournalist Sayed Ahmad Al Mousawi from Duraz who have been vomiting blood but receiving no adequate medical care. On 22nd September Mrs Rowan Sangoor was jailed for 30 days. She had complained to The Red Cross of the prison conditions and deteriorating health of her brother, Ali who had posed in 2011 with his blood-soaked body after regime’s forces had fired on peaceful protesters.
Bahrain Freedom Movement
27th September 2017 (info@vob.orgwww.vob.org)
Virus-free. www.avg.com
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Mr SAM
Wed 27/09/2017, 09:31
WP: Saudi Arabia is a dungeon, Alkhalifa heavily criticised at HRC
The UK’s relations with Saudi Arabia were criticised by senior figures of the Labour Party at the ongoing annual conference in Brighton. Shadow Foreign Secretary Emily Thornberry criticized the ruling Conservative government for turning a blind eye to Saudi Arabia’s deadly war against Yemen, and selling Riyadh new weapons that would be used against Yemeni civilians. “It is rank hypocrisy,” she said. “But it also illustrates a basic fact that the world we want to see – a world governed by ethics and values, a world based on rules and laws will never truly exist as long as governments and world leaders get to decide for themselves when it suits them to play by the rules and when the rules can be safely ignored.”. Last week it was announced that Saudi Arabia was not welcome to attend the conference because of its destructive war on Yemen. Pro-democracy, human rights and anti-war activists have welcomed these steps which come at a time when the Saudis are wreaking havoc not only in the region but the world over for their role in the mushrooming of extremism and terrorism. The Saudi war on Yemen has surfaced repeatedly at the Human Rights Council session in Geneva where an independent inquiry into Saudi crimes is demanded.
In an attempt to dampen the criticism of their tribal regime, the Saudis announced that they would allow women to drive cars after 28 years of struggle by women activists. The move is seen as a cunning move to stifle the international criticism of the kingdom’s dismal human rights record. Yesterday a prominent writer was arrested for his mild criticism of the regime. Jamil Al Farisi joins hundreds of prisoners of conscience languishing behind bars in the kingdom of fear.  On 20th September The Washington Post’s editorial was titled: “The   ‘new’ Saudi Arabia is still a dungeon”. It said: ONCE AGAIN, news from Saudi Arabia points toward the old thinking and not the modern society promised by the new crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman. Despite the lofty rhetoric of the crown prince’s “Vision 2030” declaration, he increasingly resembles an earlier generation of leaders with authoritarian methods. Saudi Arabia has been, and seems determined to remain, a dungeon for those who want to practice free speech.”
On 20 September 2017, UN Assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights Andrew Gilmour presented the office’s eighth report on reprisals at the 36th Session of the Human Rights Council (HRC). He said that the Bahraini regime has engaged in an “ongoing trend of major harassment and intimidation against human rights defenders; the imposition of travel bans on selected individuals; the arrest, detention, and ill-treatment of targeted individuals; and one particular case involving sexual assault and torture as a form of reprisal,” referring to human rights defender Ebtisam al-Saegh, In Bahrain, reprisals function as part of an “orchestrated crackdown on civil society,” and “the authorities have resorted to drastic measures to curb dissenting opinions.” The report expressed particular concern about the government’s consistent use of mass travel bans as a “politically motivated strategy to prevent human rights defenders” from travelling to international events such as HRC sessions. It names activists Hussain Salam Ahmed Radhi, Ebtisam al-Saegh, Ebrahim Al-Demistani, Abdulnabi Al-Ekry, Mohammed Jawad, Nedal Al-Salman, Enas Oun, and human rights lawyer Mohammed Al-Tajer as examples. Echoing the spokesperson for the High Commissioner for Human Rights, the report expresses grave concern that the Bahraini government’s repeated targeting of Nabeel Rajab is “connected to his engagement with the Human Rights Council.”
On 22nd September Amnesty International (AI) issued an Urgent Action calling for the release of Nabeel Rajab. It said that he is being tried in relation to comments posted and retweeted on his Twitter account about the war in Yemen and allegations of torture in Jaw prison is. If found guilty, Nabeel Rajab faces up to 15 years’ imprisonment. AI urged people to call for his immediate and unconditional release, ensure he is not tortured, urge Alkhalifa to uphold the right to freedom of expression and repeal laws that criminalize the peaceful exercise of those rights. Over the past two weeks the native Baharna majority have been harassed as they prepared to commemorate the martyrdom of Imam Hussain ibn Ali. ISIS-style masked members of regime’s Death Squads roamed towns and villages tearing banners and firing on people. A total of 43 attacks were recorded by AlWefaq prior to the start of the public mourning.
As the attacks on the political inmates at the notorious Jaw prison continued, reports are circulating of serious illnesses among inmates. Among the names are Qassem Ali Aradi from Samaheej and photojournalist Sayed Ahmad Al Mousawi from Duraz who have been vomiting blood but receiving no adequate medical care. On 22nd September Mrs Rowan Sangoor was jailed for 30 days. She had complained to The Red Cross of the prison conditions and deteriorating health of her brother, Ali who had posed in 2011 with his blood-soaked body after regime’s forces had fired on peaceful protesters.
Bahrain Freedom Movement
27th September 2017 (info@vob.orgwww.vob.org)

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